Slongo

Scott Longo

Posts tagged "painting"

Jean Dubuffet
Vire-volte (Spinning Round), 1961
"This work belongs to a series called ‘Paris Circus’, which reflect the excitement of Dubuffet’s return to the city after living in the countryside for seven years. In the intervening period, he had attempted to remove all human presence, including his own, from his work. The new Paris pictures, by contrast, were teeming with humanity. Dubuffet wrote: "The presence in them of the painter now is constant, even exaggerated. They are full of personages, and this time their role is played with spirit.”
 

Jean Dubuffet

Vire-volte (Spinning Round), 1961

"This work belongs to a series called ‘Paris Circus’, which reflect the excitement of Dubuffet’s return to the city after living in the countryside for seven years. In the intervening period, he had attempted to remove all human presence, including his own, from his work. The new Paris pictures, by contrast, were teeming with humanity. Dubuffet wrote: "The presence in them of the painter now is constant, even exaggerated. They are full of personages, and this time their role is played with spirit.”

 

palmofmyhands:

Basquiat Jean-Michel “Mr. Greedy” 1986

palmofmyhands:

Basquiat Jean-Michel “Mr. Greedy” 1986

(via shisoup)

bofransson:


Spencer Gore, The Fig Tree, c.1912.

bofransson:

Spencer Gore, The Fig Tree, c.1912.

(via rgf-imagesinsequence)

vermeerdebutoconunpibe:

Kazimir Malévich
verylargebuildings:

Richard Aldrich
Untitled / 2011
oil, wax, enamel and charcoal on linen / 84 x 58”

verylargebuildings:

Richard Aldrich

Untitled / 2011

oil, wax, enamel and charcoal on linen / 84 x 58”

(via carolyn-k)

nyc-arts:

Henri Matisse often painted the same piece over and over again, to push its artistic quality. See pairs, trios and series from throughout his long career, starting today at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: http://bit.ly/THg6ti 

nyc-arts:

Henri Matisse often painted the same piece over and over again, to push its artistic quality. See pairs, trios and series from throughout his long career, starting today at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: http://bit.ly/THg6ti 

(via sfmoma)

cavetocanvas:

Thomas Wilmer Dewing, After Sunset, 1892
From the Freer & Sackler Galleries:

During the early 1890s Dewing painted a series of landscapes with figures which he referred to as “decorations.” After Sunset’s two evening-gowned women in a twilight setting are rendered in soft fresco-like tones of green, mauve, and white. While the figures are precise and somewhat linear in execution, the landscape itself is freely painted and the canvas coarsely woven. The artist’s subject matter always remained ambiguous, never attempting to convey a message or tell a story. Dewing thought that the public failed to understand these landscape “decorations” as they did his interior scenes with figures. He wrote to Freer, “My decorations belong to the poetic and imaginative world where a few choice spirits live.” (Thomas Wilmer Dewing to Charles Lang Freer, February 16, 1901, Freer Gallery of Art Archives.) Not only was the artist trying to establish a mood in his paintings, but the very ambiguity of the mood demanded viewer participation—and an appreciation of beauty for its own sake.

cavetocanvas:

Thomas Wilmer Dewing, After Sunset, 1892

From the Freer & Sackler Galleries:

During the early 1890s Dewing painted a series of landscapes with figures which he referred to as “decorations.” After Sunset’s two evening-gowned women in a twilight setting are rendered in soft fresco-like tones of green, mauve, and white. While the figures are precise and somewhat linear in execution, the landscape itself is freely painted and the canvas coarsely woven. The artist’s subject matter always remained ambiguous, never attempting to convey a message or tell a story. Dewing thought that the public failed to understand these landscape “decorations” as they did his interior scenes with figures. He wrote to Freer, “My decorations belong to the poetic and imaginative world where a few choice spirits live.” (Thomas Wilmer Dewing to Charles Lang Freer, February 16, 1901, Freer Gallery of Art Archives.) Not only was the artist trying to establish a mood in his paintings, but the very ambiguity of the mood demanded viewer participation—and an appreciation of beauty for its own sake.

Still Life with Berries and Currants
1859-60

Still Life with Berries and Currants

1859-60

(Source: sluicetwo)

blastedheath:

Henri de Saint-Delis (French, 1878-1949), Vallée vaudoise, le viaduc. Oil on canvas, 116.2 x 88.9 cm.

blastedheath:

Henri de Saint-Delis (French, 1878-1949), Vallée vaudoise, le viaduc. Oil on canvas, 116.2 x 88.9 cm.

(via carolyn-k)

composition-improvisation:

Gustav Klimt, The House of Guardaboschi, c. 1912

composition-improvisation:

Gustav Klimt, The House of Guardaboschi, c. 1912

(Source: impartart, via coveleski)

pederost:

James Ensor
Self-Portrait with Masks, 1889Oil on Canvas 

pederost:

James Ensor

Self-Portrait with Masks, 1889
Oil on Canvas 

(Source: andrewharlow, via coveleski)

Francis Bacon, ‘Bending Figure, No. 2’
circa 1957-61
Ballpoint pen and oil on paper

Francis Bacon, ‘Bending Figure, No. 2’

circa 1957-61

Ballpoint pen and oil on paper

painal:

Francis Bacon, ‘Figure Bending Forwards’
Circa 1957-‘61

painal:

Francis Bacon, ‘Figure Bending Forwards’

Circa 1957-‘61

(via coveleski)

(Source: chewasd)

(Source: 27482, via altcomics)